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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
think my answer is yes and no. the previous debt ceiling standoff, one of the issues was when would the next debt ceiling be reached, annoy, remember the republicans -- and even harry reid suggested that they do this every six months, get a temporary extension and come back in six months. at one point the republicans were proposing three extensions, three votes before the next election. and the president, meeting with his own aides about this said that's it. i'm done. i'm not doing this. this is not how the constitution was meant -- was designed. our founding fathers did not envision a day when members of congress could hold the president hostage by not paying the bills they themselves had racked up. and as often happens in these situations, the cooler heads on his staff said, well, mr. president, we understand how you feel, but we may have to cut the -- no, i'm not going to do it. he was very firm because he believed it was not just affecting him but about preserving the status of the presidency for future presidents. and in the end one of the things he was most proud of in that de
bypassing the debt ceiling -- on congress's behalf. >> democrats are urging the president to use executive order to say congress, i don't node to you raise the debt ceiling, i am going to do it on my own. i want everybody to know,utive order -- high is not the first president and won't be the last to use executive order. frankslinrosis velt passed 37 executive orders and clinton and reagan did 350-plus. i am talking about policy issues of significant magnitude that need to have a full public vetting. the american people need tock engaged in the process. we need hearing on the matter ogun control, specifically. and we really need to talk about mental health and how we as a society are not embracing people with mental health issues. that's a bigger conversation, i know, neil. >> neil: thank you for indulging all of this breaking news and being on top of it. we told you about the mulvaney amendment, matching dollar for dollar, any aide they are getting in like-minded cuts from discretionary spending. that was defeated, as expected on the flor of the house. to missouri running senator roy blun
to call for the reaching of common ground on these major issues, like the debt ceiling, the budget, gun-control, immigration, tax reform, those kinds of things. i think it is true that we have a divided government now. it has been a difficult four years, but president obama is a natural conciliate her -- conciliation person, and he will make that a big theme of his second term. i think you will hear some of that tomorrow. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can draw an analogy to two former president, franklin roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural. the president said, i came in with a huge crisis, i have been leading this country through, we're on the right path. we are going to keep going. he has a phrase in there -- have we found our happy valley? it was a very fine speech. i would have to go back and look at it again. i do not read it as being an aggr
forward on some key issues such as gun control, immigration reform, tries to deal with the debt ceiling. and finally, we're told that the president will push to get the public engaged, engaged in their community, engaged in the issues to put pressure on congress to move the president's initiatives forward, john. this is seen as sort of the stage one or the act one, part two will be the president's state of the union address where he'll add more details to his proposals. >> you split it into acts there, dan, appropriate because we saw the president today, the swearing-in ceremony, but because this is a sunday, we saw him only briefly in the blue room. how has he been spending the rest of the day, and what are his plans for this evening? >> reporter: this evening within this hour, the president will be heading to the building museum for a candlelight reception there. he will be making remarks, but much of the day, you know, was quite busy earlier in the day, then had some down time. the president's still working on his speech. we're told that he's in the final stages. he did a lot of it o
the administration yesterday on this issue. what do you think? if the debt ceiling negotiable. from eugene, oregon, jed is independent. caller: my opinion is you cannot convince me there is not excess spending and that people cannot still get paid. the debt ceiling cannot continue going up. we wonder why the majority of the united states is in debt. it is because we are taught that by government. we cannot keep borrowing. an e-mail is going around that i've seen on facebook as well, saying its 545 vs 300 million. if both sides of the party don't like debt and they don't like the deficit, then why do we have them? it's a pretty simple question. host: we will keep the conversation going throughout this morning, talking with two members of the house of representatives about their take on the debt ceiling and gun- control and other big-ticket items better up from debate in the 113 congress. on our facebook page, this is what folks are saying. jed in eugene, oregon, independent. i just spoke with him. i'm sorry. david is in kentucky, democratic caller. caller: yes, you do a good job. the last caller ha
have been here but i think some of those issues like the debt ceiling, this is absolutely new territory. >> stephanie: yeah even the republican party -- we have just not seen a version of it that it was willing to take the united states hostage -- >> we have never seen that but we have never seen the kind of use of the filibuster that we see now to stop everything, and as you said, the blocking of appointments. there has always been this courtesy to the president of the united states to at least have hearings and -- and debates about these nominees but you know -- one person to stop it -- >> stephanie: right. and the way the main stream media covers it drives me insane. the president nominates a republican, and there is outrage. >> i know and he doesn't have enough beer parties or something. >> stephanie: yeah exactly. the other thing the president addressed was gun legislation, and if it is not different this time, congress woman i don't know when it will be if you watched any those sandy hook families yesterday. >> wasn't that stunning? >> stephanie
with the debt ceiling and the full faith and credit of the u.s., overwhelmingly agree with him on issues like taxes. 90% agree with him, for example, on universal background checks on the purchase of a weapon. it's very different from what happened with george bush when he won a very narrow victory in 2004 and then said he had a mandate and decided he had a mandate to privatize social security, which was deeply unpopular. the great strength of the president here is he knows what he wants to do, he's very focused, and he has the country with him. some of this stuff is going to be tough to get through congress and you may have to fight it in the midterms and beyond, but he's going to make real progress, i think, because of what he believes and because he's got the country with him. >> well, these are kind of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government going and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtown has changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight.
on the debt ceiling increase? are you going to be-- does that help? >> well, it's helpful that they have now dropped their demand, that the only way they're going to pay the country's billes, they themselves racked up, would be to extract some concessions. we've got to never again have this threat to the global economy and our economy because congress may not pay its bills. now, three months is no way to run an economy or railroad or anything else so that's not ideal. so i think it's a significant moment that the republican party now has moved off their position that the only way they're going to pay their bills is if they ge the correct kind of concessions. now, where does that leave us? i think we would be better served to go back to regular order in congress so we're notica reaping crisis to crisis; congress ought to work together and come up with a long-term fiscal plan >> but you see this as a good sign? >> i think they're no longer saying the only way we pay our bills is to have huge cuts in things like medicare. that's positive. listen you see our economy-- good housing numbers this p
on the hill after the debt ceiling negotiation. for that reason and other, his looming confirmation hearing could be bumpy. but if confirmed, lew will likely be dealing with the top issue in this second term, how to get the economy moving and addressing the count re's long-term fiscal problems. >> this is a president that is forced to grapple to the tenor of our times with the budget woes, with the economy that can't get over the hump. it's going to consume most of his time, i believe, in the second term. >> what he cannot do, going into this term is go from economic crisis to economic crisis. that's not leadership. what he will have to do is figure out how we address this in a broader policy way. >> health care reform cannot wait, it must not wait and won't wait another year. >> he chose kansas governor kathleen sebelius to get health care legislation done, he largely passed control over to continuing to get -- to congress to get the bill together. it became a messy process, about a 2,000-plus-page bill. >> this notion that this has been not transparent and people don't know what's in the
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)